FAQs

Have a question about our cover?

FAQs

Choose a topic below to find out the most frequently asked questions.

Do you cover BOAS in dog breeds such as French Bulldogs and Pugs?

BOAS (Brachycephalic Obstructive Airway Syndrome) is a condition which is a progressive disorder that can impair the ability of certain breeds of short nose dog to exercise, play, eat and sleep.

We are able to consider claims provided that there are no pre-existing signs, symptoms or advice provided by a vet. In practice this usually means that the dog has to be insured with us from a very young age.

What is Public Liability cover for dogs?

Public Liability insurance for your dog – sometimes referred to as Third Party Liability insurance – can provide up to £2million per event if your dog injures someone or damages property and you are held liable.

If you’re out for a walk with your dog and they were to knock somebody over, then we can keep you covered if you’ve chosen our Public Liability option.

Heading out for a dog walk shouldn’t end in hefty compensation costs, which is why we offer dog owners Public Liability protection for claims of property damage or injury from a third party.

Cover only applies in the UK.

Some dog breeds cannot be covered by our Third Party Liability option – see “Are there any breeds of dog that you are unable to insure?” For assistance dogs to qualify for Third Party Liability cover, they must have been trained by a member of, and within the guidance of, the organisation of Assistance Dogs UK.

What is the minimum/maximum age for a pet to be insured?

Your pet must be eight weeks old at the start date of cover. There is no maximum pet age to apply for this insurance, but there are age limits on cover sections.

Death due to illness is limited to pets under five years of age at the time of the incident. Full details are found in the policy wording.

Do you provide cover for chronic and ongoing veterinary conditions?

We offer a choice of three annual benefit levels. You can insure up to the chosen limit each year and provided that we are able to offer renewal and you renew without a gap in cover the benefit will be reinstated for the next period of insurance. This means that you can claim for chronic or ongoing conditions such as arthritis, diabetes, heart or skin conditions whilst the policy remains in force.

Can I get insurance for working dogs?

Yes, we are able to cover working dogs. This would include a dog that is being used for shooting, hunting, or working with livestock. Also a dog that performs tasks to assist a human companion, including therapy dogs.

Can I get insurance for guard dogs?

No, sorry – we cannot cover pets that are used for guarding.

Do you insure pets used for breeding?

No, sorry - we cannot provide cover for pets that are used for breeding. There are special policies for their specific risks, and we suggest you speak to your vet or local insurance broker for help finding suitable cover.

Can I get insurance for crossbreeds?

Yes, we are able to cover a crossbreed cat or dog.

Are there any breeds of dog that you are unable to insure?

Unfortunately, for all of our policies, we cannot provide any cover (whether pedigree, cross breed or mixed breed) for the following: Dogo Argentino, Fila Brazillero, Japanese Tosa, Pit Bull, Shar-Pei, Wolf or Wolf Hybrid dog and any animal registered under the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 and/or the Dogs (Muzzling) regulations (Northern Ireland) 1991 or any amendments.

For those that choose our Third Party Liability cover option, we cannot provide the Third Party Liability cover in any circumstances for any insured dog that is required to be registered under the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 and/or the Dogs (Muzzling) regulations (Northern Ireland) 1991 or any amendments, or any American Bulldog, American Indian Dog, American Pit Bull Terrier, American Staffordshire Terrier, Bandog, Boerboel, Bully Kutta, Canary Dog, Cane Corso, Czechoslovakian Wolfdog, Dingo, Dogo Argentino, Dogue Brasileiro, Fila Brasileiro, Gull Dong, Husky Wolf Hybrid, Irish Staffordshire Blue Bull Terrier, Irish Staffordshire Bull Terrier, Japanese Tosa, Pit Bull Terrier, Saarlooswolfhound, Tosa, Tosa Inu, Wolf Hybrid, Wolfdog, or any dog crossbred or mixed with any of these breeds.

Is dental treatment covered?

Yes. Depending on the type of cover you select we are able to cover treatment provided that it is related to an injury or illness.

What information do you need to start my cover?

We need some details about you and the pet you wish to insure together with either bank account or debit/credit card details for payment of the premium.

How do you calculate premiums?

We look at a number of factors including the age and breed of the pet, the risk of chronic or recurring conditions associated with certain breeds, the area the pet lives in and any claims history.

Do you only cover UK residents?

Yes. You must be a UK resident and domiciled in the UK.

How can I pay for my policy?

You can choose to pay in full by credit or debit card. Alternatively, you can take advantage of our interest free monthly payment option and simply spread the payments out, without any additional cost.

Can you pay my vet directly?

This is something we are able to do provided that your vet is happy with this arrangement.

How do I make a claim?

If you need to make a claim (excluding Third Party Liability claims), then feel free to contact our UK-based claims team. Once you've made a claim, we can keep you updated regularly by text or email.

Make your claim by either calling Covea Insurance on: 0333 130 4534 or email: claims@petadminteam.com

For Third Party Liability claims, contact Ageas Insurance Ltd on: 0345 415 0495

For Dog Liability claims, please contact Ageas Insurance by either phone: 0345 415 0495 or email: commercialclaims.eastleighteam@ageas.co.uk

How long can I claim for each condition?

Provided that you have chosen our Accident & Illness cover we will refresh your veterinary fees benefit each year allowing you to claim for ongoing conditions on your pet insurance for as long as we are able to offer a renewal and you renew without a gap in cover.

Is there an excess on this policy?

Yes there is an excess you will need to pay in respect of each illness or injury for which you wish to claim each year. These are as follows:

Veterinary Fees

For each illness or injury arising during each period of insurance your excess will be:

  • For pets under eight years of age at time of treatment: The first £100.
  • For pets older than eight years of age at time of treatment: The first £100 plus 20% of the remaining cost of treatment.

Holiday Cancellation -The first £75 of the claim

Accidental Damage to Third Party Property -The first £75 of the claim

Accidental Damage to Pet Accessories - The first £50 of the claim

Emergency Expenses -The first £50 of the claim

Third Party Liability -The first £250 of property damage claim

Am I covered to take my pet abroad?

Your pet can be covered abroad if you select the Overseas Travel cover, providing your pet complies with the Pet Travel Scheme (PETS).

Overseas Travel can be a useful option if you are planning to take your pet on holiday with you. This allows you to travel with your pet to anywhere in Europe (including Channel Islands, Isle of Man and the Republic of Ireland) for up to 60 days at a time.

Now that the UK has left the European Union, you should consult the government’s website for the latest information and/or speak to your vet about how this may impact your travel after 1st January 2021.

What is the best way to travel abroad with a cat or dog?

To help reduce the stress levels in your cat or dog, traveling by car or train is usually the better option. If you have no choice but to travel by plane, flying is still a safe option for your pet. However, traveling by car does allow pet owners to keep a much closer eye on their pets, with the added bonus of being able to pull-over for breaks as often as you want. When traveling by train or plane, there will be tighter restrictions on where your pet can sit, how often (if they can in fact) move around, and with more people traveling alongside you, your pet could become increasingly stressed.

Before traveling on any long journey, carefully consider what the best form of transport for your cat or dog would be, and how you feel they would cope on the journey.

Can I travel with my cat or dog on a plane?

Most airlines will allow you to take a cat or dog on the plane, either in the cabin or down below in cargo. Before booking your flight, check with the airline that they can in fact, fly your pet. You may have to book in advance, with some airlines charging additional fees for traveling pets.

Your pet will need a Pet Passport before they can fly, as this will need to be presented to the airline when checking in your pet. Depending on where your pet is flying from and where they are flying to, they will need to have certain vaccinations and treatments for illnesses such as rabies or tapeworm. You will most likely need to proof of the vaccinations and treatment from your vet.

How should I prepare my cat or dog for traveling abroad?

If you’re traveling abroad, or simply going away for a few days in the UK, it’s still a good idea to prep your pet for the journey. Such preparation measures could help reduce the stress levels in your pet, help you understand how best your pet travels, and help make the journey that little bit easier for both you and your pet.

  • Before taking your pet on any long car journey, take them on short drives close to home, while slowly increasing the amount of time spent in the car. This will not only help them get used to being confined in a car, but it could help them overcome travel sickness if they suffer from it.
  • Avoid feeding your cat or dog right before traveling, as the motion of the car, train or plane could upset their stomach. Make sure they have plenty of water, so they are well hydrated.
  • Before any long journey, consider the health of your pet. Are they fit and healthy enough to travel? Make sure they are up to date with their vaccinations and treatments and be sure to check if they need any additional ones, as this could be a requirement of certain countries or airlines.
  • To help ensure your pet is comfortable while traveling, make sure they have plenty of water, (food but depending how well they travel on a full stomach), toys to keep them occupied, and a comfortable place to sleep and rest. Most importantly, they need to be secured while traveling, whether it be in a crate that is large enough for them to sit in, stand and move around in, or strapped in using a proper pet seat belt for the car.

What are the other alternatives to taking your pet on holiday?

If you don’t want to take your cat or dog on holiday with you, then why not consider the following instead:

  • Leave your pet with a friend or family member
  • Have a qualified pet-sitter come around to your home, to feed, walk and check-up on your pet
  • Take your pet to a reputable kennel or cattery